IS IMPULSE BUYING COSTING YOU MONEY? LET’S FIX IT.

is impulse buying costing you money? let's fix it

Hi guys, I hope you had a fabulous weekend and that your week is going great. When I was grocery shopping during the weekend I realised how far I’ve come from doing any shopping in general. You see, before I would go into a store and pick something up because it either looks good or maybe I wanted to try it out without even giving it a thought whether or not I really needed it. I still have a juicer which resides in a cupboard because I thought I would be into juicing at the time. Nowadays, I’ve rectified that by knowing that impulse buying was the culprit and was costing me money. So onto the question is impulse buying costing you money?

The answer is YES

I know that sometimes you might really want something once you see it and I also know that unlike me, there some people who would like to have five sweaters of the same kind but in different colours. Don’t get me wrong but I just think that it’s a waste of money and would rather spend that money on something else. How can you fix that?

1.STAY ORGANISED

When I talk about staying organised, I mean know exactly what you have and don’t have around your home and if there is anything that you need to replace. Once your organisation is on point, you will less likely want to get something on the whim when you are out. So remember to get it together first by having an organisation plan. There’s no point of having three kettles just because they would look nice on your counter. To see how I get organised, find here.

2.HAVE A BUDGET

Impulse buying usually happens when you think or assume that you need something and not knowing it will cost you. To avoid that, have a monthly or weekly budget for everything, your groceries, home products, just everything. Once you have a budget in place, be tight with it and stick to it. When I started budgeting, I failed many times because I didn’t stick to it and ended up struggling when I really wanted something and it wasn’t good, you need to sacrifice all the temptations and just do it. AΒ budget planner will really help if you’re just starting out.

3.CARRY CASH ONLY

This can be debatable depending on what you are shopping for but if you know exactly what it is, then leave your credit cards at home and just carry the amount of cash you need. I noticed that when I carried my card, I was more likely to buy impulsively compared to when I only had cash because with the cash, I had no leeway at all and if the amount passes my budget, then I had to return some stuff. This is the only way to avoid impulse buying which at the end of it all costs you money you would be saving.

IS IMPULSE BUYING COSTING YOU MONEY? LET'S FIX IT

4.WRITE LISTS

Writing down lists is a really good way to make you stay in check and that’s why all the points above will rely on you having lists when you are out doing your shopping to hold you accountable when you decide to pick up something that’s not on the list, because that would be impulse buying. If it’s not on the list put it back and leave it for the next budget. I wrote more on this here when it comes to things you can do to start saving money.

5.AVOID TEMPTATION

This is hard even for me because when I see something, I convince myself that I might need it then once I buy it, I have to come back and create a different budget since I would have taken some from the next month’s budget. If you know you are likely to want to get something once you see it, then avoid those shops or even seeing what they have because it will only lead to more impulses and that will cost you.

6.ANALYSE & REPEAT

Lastly, after every end of month or week depending on how you created your budget, get time to go through your lists, budget and see what you have done right and where you need to improve on then repeat. Once you continue doing that, you will notice that the need to buy stuff impulsively will go away because you know how much you have saved from not doing it.

So that’s all I have for you today, Β keep at it and take care of your impulse buying with the above points and know it’s a process, so just starting will at least push you in the right direction. At the end of it all, you are the only person who knows whether or not impulse buying is a habit you have and are also the only one who can take care of it. If you have any other pointers for me please do share in the comments below, ask yourself are you an impulse buyer?

 

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32 Comments

  1. It is soooo important to avoid temptation! For me that means staying away from malls and targets altogether haha. No reason teasing myself with stuff I can’t afford.
    xx
    courtneylivin.com

  2. Your tips are on point. Without a list you’re buying everything in site. I stay with my list. Impulsive buying does get me sometimes but I stay with a short amount in my pocket to avoid that habit. But sometimes I will still rush home and get the extra funds and go back πŸ˜†

  3. This was a major thing from especially back in college. It wasn’t on material items or clothing. I would impulse buy food at work… I mean pay the whole shift’s tab when I know I cooked at home and could have brought my lunch. Lesson learned the hard way. That money forever gone.

  4. It is so easy to impulse buy! I budget and keep lists. The list has helped the most. It keeps me from buying other stuff. Then, when a sale comes along, I get it. Great tips!

    1. I used to impulse buy all the time until it went way out of hand and I was finding stuff I never even remembered buying, but I stopped it and got it in check.

  5. having a list really worked for me too. I never was an impulsive buyer to begin with but it has helped me to stay organized and focused on what i really need

  6. Great tips here. I myself list down all the things I spend on, even the smallest amount, and make a graph out of it (sounds tedious, I know). At the end of the month, I am able to see where I have overspent, and what needs more budget allocation. I have been doing menu planning for the past 3 months now and it has definitely helped lower down my grocery budget because I no longer have to keep on returning to the grocery just to buy something that I thought on impulse.

    1. Yes exactly, nothing can be tedious if it’s saving you money. I have to have a menu after every two weeks and lists every time I do any sort of shopping which has really helped so far.

  7. This is an extremely helpful post as I am guilty of impulse buying things I don’t really need. I have tried leaving the credit card at home a few times which works very well.

    1. Thank you, I used to do it all the time until I noticed it’s the cheeky card always calling out for me so once I started leaving it and budgeting things started staying on track.

  8. I think I’m quite good at not impulse buying. I occasionally do it, but not all the time. I’m very focused when I shop, and head straight for the things I need, so I’m never really looking at other stuff πŸ™‚

    Louise x

    1. You are strong willed and that’s great as for me it’s like things just call me in every aisle, but I have put it in check and it’s going great.

    1. I haven’t read it I will try and find it, but that’s a great tip because it gives you the whole 30 days to really think whether it’s a necessity or not, nice one.

  9. Great tips. I got in the habit of bringing cash with me when I lived in a place that was not credit card/debit card friendly. Now it helps with my budgeting.

  10. I’ve been trying to get better at this. Like you said, it’s easier to make a list. I usually add items to my Amazon cart when I really need. Or sometimes I leave it for a few days, and then I realize it’s something I don’t need anymore.

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